Attractions

Stroll back through history and enjoy world class theatre, fine dining, shopping, estate wineries, farm markets and historical sites.

Niagara-on-the-Lake, often called the loveliest town in Ontario, has a long and distinguished history.

There are so many things to do in NOTL. Here are some of our suggestions:

Visitor’s Guide

The 2015 Niagara-on-the-Lake Visitor’s Guide can be downloaded frpm the Niagara-on-the-Lake Tourism Web site.

https://www.niagaraonthelake.com/page/Visitors_Guide


Wineries of Niagara on the Lake

The Wineries of Niagara-on-the-Lake; we’re 27 wineries nestled below the Escarpment amidst a landscape of vineyards and orchards stretching from the picturesque Niagara River Parkway (the drive Sir Winston Churchill called the prettiest in Canada) to the shores of Lake Ontario. We’re a close-knit community, mere minutes from each other, and can be found throughout Niagara-on-the-Lake, the historic town ranked as Canada’s #1 Food & Wine Destination by TripAdvisor in 2011.

http://wineriesofniagaraonthelake.com


Shaw Festival

In 1962, in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, lawyer and playwright Brian Doherty parlayed his love for the work of Irish playwright Bernard Shaw into a summer theatre festival, producing eight performances of Don Juan in Hell and Candida in the Court House auditorium. In this singular act of passion for theatre and culture, the Shaw Festival was born.

http://www.shawfest.com


Bicentennial War of 1812

The official site for the Town of Niagara-on-the-Lake’s Bicentennial Committee. This group was formed to help celebrate Niagara-on-the-Lake’s significant role in shaping Canada as we know it today.

http://www.1812niagaraonthelake.ca/home-s11386


Fort George National Historic Site

During the War of 1812, Fort George served as the headquarters for the Centre Division of the British Army. These forces included British regulars, local militia, aboriginal warriors, and Runchey's corps of freed slaves. Major General Sir Isaac Brock, "the saviour of Upper Canada" served here until his death at the Battle of Queenston Heights in October, 1812. Brock and his aide-de-camp John Macdonell were initially buried within the fort. Fort George was destroyed by American artillery fire and captured during the Battle of Fort George in May 1813. The U.S. forces used the fort as a base to invade the rest of Upper Canada, however, they were repulsed at the Battles of Stoney Creek and Beaver Dams. After a seven month occupation, the fort was retaken in December and remained in British hands for the remainder of the war. After the war, the fort was partially rebuilt, and by the 1820’s it was falling into ruins. It was finally abandoned in favour of a more strategic installation at Fort Mississauga and a more protected one at Butler’s Barracks.

http://www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-nhs/on/fortgeorge/index.aspx


Butterfly Conservatory

This magical attraction features over 2,000 colourful tropical butterflies floating freely among lush, exotic blossoms and greenery.

Paths wind through the rainforest setting, past a pond and waterfall and the Emergence window, where butterflies leave their pupae and prepare to take their first flight!

http://www.niagaraparks.com/niagara-falls-attractions/butterfly-conservatory.html